The program can be run using the xprivacy.bat script (Windows) or xprivacy script (Linux). Use the -h option to get help on the syntax for specifying command line options. The program can be used to process a single file or run in daemon mode in which it can process multiple files in sequence.

A valid license is necessary to run the program and must be specified in the configuration file. Contact DATPROF support for a license.

Single file mode

Example to run File Masking to process just one file:

Windows:

...\bin\xprivacy.bat -c myconfig.conf -i myinput.xml -o myoutput.xml
CODE

Linux:

.../bin/xprivacy -c myconfig.conf -i myinput.xml -o myoutput.xml
CODE

where '...' is the path to the installation directory.

Daemon mode

In daemon mode (using '-d' or '--daemon' option) you specify the input directory and output directory (instead of specifying input file and output file when running in single file mode). Within the input directory there are three additional directories: processing, failed and done. These directories will be created when they don't exist.

Each file copied to the input directory will be picked-up by the program. First it is moved to the processing directory. After being successfully processed, the file is moved to the done directory. The result file is put in the output directory. If there was an error, the input file is moved to the failed directory and no result file is created.

As soon as the file appears in the input directory, the file will be picked up by the program. To ensure the file is not still being written to when the program starts to read the file for processing, it's best to create the file outside the input directory (but on the same filesystem) and then move the file to the input directory. The move (or rename) is (on most filesystems) an atomic action.

Example to run File Masking in daemon mode:

Windows:

...\bin\xprivacy.bat -c myconfig.conf -i inputdir -o outputdir -d
CODE


Linux:

.../bin/xprivacy -c myconfig.conf -i inputdir -o outputdir -d
CODE


To gracefully shutdown the daemon, just create a file called '_stop_' in the input directory. After processing the last file put in the input directory before the '_stop_' file was created, the program will remove the '_stop_' file and terminate.

To stop the daemon program:
Windows:

echo > ...\inputdir\_stop_
CODE


Linux:

touch .../inputdir/_stop_
CODE